Welcome to Climate Answers

Climate change is the most serious issue ever to have faced humanity. Rightly, it is now high on the public, political, media and business agendas. However, too much of the discussion is still about what we should not be doing or what we should be against. There is not enough discussion or information on solutions – what we can and should do to minimise dangerous climate change, and what should be done to make us not only safer and more secure, but also richer and happier.

read more »

Being pro-nuclear does not undermine climate and energy goals

Our response to Sussex Uni. Being pro-nuclear does not effect decarbonisation and renewables. It doesn’t matter to the climate how we decarbonise, it just matters that we do.

read more »

Floating wind-farms – unlocking energy on the ocean

floating wind pic

Harnessing the world’s wind has developed into one of the most successful methods for generating renewable electricity and now floating wind-farms present even greater opportunities.

read more »

How community benefits from shale gas could work

Consultancy Remsol has today published a constructive Blueprint for shale gas community benefits. (http://www.remsol.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Remsol-A-Blueprint-for-Shale-Gas-Community-Benefits-09082016.pdf ). I wrote the foreword: “UK shale gas production could and should be part of a low-carbon transition, enabling Britain to phase out coal more quickly while strengthening energy security. Domestically-extracted shale gas would be less climate-damaging than coal, but also than […]

read more »

29 July 2016: Open letter to Greg Clark MP on Hinkley review

Dear Greg, Congratulations on your appointment to run BEIS. I welcome the creation of the new department (see http://climateanswers.info/2016/07/15-july-2016-new-british-government-a-step-forward-for-climate-strategy/). And it is great to have you back working on energy and climate change. I also welcome your decision to review the Hinkley Point C proposal, following yesterday’s Final Investment Decision by EDF. The UK needs […]

read more »

July 2016: Weinberg Next Nuclear summer newsletter

http://www.the-weinberg-foundation.org/2016/07/21/our-summer-newsletter/ Articles on: a progressive narrative for a pro-nuclear civil society movement;why there is such strong anti-nuclear feeling in Germany; prospects for nuclear power in the UK.

read more »

15 July 2016: New British government: a step forward for climate strategy

The UK no longer has a department with the words ‘climate change’ in its title. Climate policy is now the responsibility of a new Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. This could be seen as a downgrading of climate action – and has been condemned by some green groups. But I think it is […]

read more »

The impact of Brexit on clean energy

What will be the impact of Brexit on clean energy in the UK? Answer: nobody knows, because nothing is remotely clear in British politics now. Who will be prime minister? Will there be an early general election? What will be the relationship between the UK and the remaining EU member-states? Will there even be a […]

read more »

22 June 2016: What Brexit would mean for climate and environment policy

Video of Mike Childs, Head of Science, Policy and Research at Friends of the Earth, Fintan Hurley, Scientific Director at the Institute of Occupational Medicine, and me discussing this. http://www.agreenerlifeagreenerworld.net/2016/06/experts-warn-leaving-eu-would-be.html

read more »

2026: Europe’s progressive climate policies

In less than two weeks’ time, the UK will vote on whether to stay in or leave the EU. I am doing all I can for the Stronger In campaign (http://www.strongerin.co.uk/#QkGoYymoqlkpWtIE.97). Opinion polls predict a very close result. Being Labour, I never believe opinion polls. Britain could well vote to leave. But I’m also an […]

read more »

31 May 2016: The EU and domestic energy bills

Vote Leave is today claiming that, if the UK leaves the EU, domestic energy bills would be lower. They are wrong. Domestic energy bills could and should be reduced by changing taxes and tariffs. It is possible to do this without leaving the EU. Quitting the European Internal Energy Market – the single market for […]

read more »