Articles containing the tag ‘renewables’

10 August 2010: Huhne delivers on local power

The UK Energy and Climate Secretary has announced that, from 18 August 2010, local councils will be allowed to sell renewable electricity. This is fast and impressive work.

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10 November 2011: The Energy Internet

Robert Webb comments on the strengths and weaknesses of the ‘Energy Internet’ vision.

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11 December 2012: How to expand renewables after 2020

CER has now published my short policy brief ‘How to expand renewable energy after 2020′.

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11 January 2010: UK offshore revolution

The UK has enormous wind potential, and is already the world leader in terms of installed offshore capacity. However, it achieved this with only 688Mw of operational offshore wind farms.

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12 August 2014: Climate policy is worth a speech

You can read my article here for the Fabian Society on a speech by the Shadow Environment Secretary, Maria Eagle, about climate change.

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12 March 2010: Solar PV makes sense in the Sahara and India

This week, another dispute has broken out between environmentalists in the UK, this time primarily between journalist and author, George Monbiot, and the head of the company, Solar Century, Jeremy Leggett, over whether it is sensible to offer householders in the UK large subsidies to install solar photovoltaic (PV) panels.

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12 October 2010: South African energy plan – the lesser of two evils

The South African government has published an energy plan which proposes a decline in the use of coal and six new nuclear power stations. The country is not short of coal, so the government should be commended for exploring alternatives.

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13 December 2013: UK energy policy going very badly

Friday the 13th – and reasons to be gloomy about UK energy policy

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13 May 2010: A new UK government

The UK has a new government and the prospects for climate policy are mixed. The promised policies on aviation and coal are stronger than those of the former Labour government. The approach to renewables is similar to that of Labour. However, the approach on nuclear power looks like a recipe for muddle and delay.

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14 January 2010: Is the EU good for business?

Today, I attended a conference organised by Business for a New Europe and the Centre for European Reform on Is the EU good for business?. The general answers was (unsurprisingly, given the organisers) ‘yes, generally, but could be better’.

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14 March 2011: The Japanese tsunami and nuclear power

The horrific current events in Japan must make all who favour nuclear power question our support. I have spent much of the weekend doing so, but still believe that nuclear power is a necessary, low-carbon bridge-technology, until the world can be 100% reliant on renewables.

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14 May 2014: A new narrative for European integration

Swiss paper Le Temps has now published (in French) my article on the need for a new narrative for European integration. Here is the English version.

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14 May 2014: My Economist Insight on why we need all clean energy sources

The Economist has published my short article on why we need energy efficiency plus all clean energy sources: renewables, carbon capture and storage and nuclear.

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15 July 2016: New British government: a step forward for climate strategy

The UK no longer has a department with the words ‘climate change’ in its title. Climate policy is now the responsibility of a new Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. This could be seen as a downgrading of climate action – and has been condemned by some green groups. But I think it is […]

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15 September 2011: Which is worse, gas or nuclear?

Is gas sufficiently low-carbon to be an adequate bridge technology? No – it’s emissions for every unit of electricity produced are over three times as high as emissions from nuclear power.

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16 January 2012: Investment in clean energy increases

Global investment in renewables and energy efficiency increased 5% to $260 billion in 2011, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

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16 June 2009: A new look at nuclear

On Saturday, I was on a panel at the World Science Festival in New York, with James Hansen of NASA and three others. Hansen’s position on nuclear can be summarised simply: it’s better than coal.

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16 March 2010: US weatherization work

This month, the US Department of Energy has announced a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) programme. This will offer grants totalling up to $109 million.

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17 July 2009: UK low-carbon transition plan

On Wednesday 15 July 2009, the UK government published its plan to make the UK a low carbon economy. It is good on electricity, quite good on energy efficiency and heat, but bad on transport.

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18 April 2010: UK manifestos and climate proposals

The manifestos of the three main UK political parties, Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat, all agree that climate change is an extremely serious issue and that tackling it can be done in ways which enhance energy security and strengthen the UK economy.

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18 February 2010: Obama builds bridges through technology

In November 2009, 3% of OECD electricity was generated by renewables other than hydro. 14% came from hydro. And this was only 17% of what electricity was then used, not total energy used.

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18 January 2010: Obama’s first year

President Obama has done more to control climate change than President Bush ever did. However, that is hardly setting the bar very high.

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18 January 2017: Why the Swansea tidal lagoon should be supported

Last week the former energy minister Charles Hendry published his review on tidal lagoons (https://hendryreview.wordpress.com/) I am a consultant to Tidal Lagoon Power (TLP), so not disinterested. But I think that anyone reading the report will recognise it as an extensive, evidence-based and therefore serious review. Hendry was in my view a good energy minister […]

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18 June 2009: Politicians debate while business builds

Today, EU national governments are meeting to discuss who should be the next President of the Commission. The current president, Jose Manuel Barroso, wants a second term and will probably be given it. This would be good for the climate.

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19 March 2010: Scotland, waves and tides

This month has seen two significant developments in plans to harness the power of the waves and the tides off the British Isles. On 2 March 2010, the Regional Development Agency for the South West of England announced the start of the construction of an onshore electricity sub-station at Hayle in Cornwall, so that power from its Wave Hub – a facility to test wave technology ten miles off the Cornish coast – can be fed into the electricity grid. And this week, the Crown Estate, the body that administers over half of the UK’s foreshore and all the seabed out to 12 miles, announced the successful bidders in the world’s first commercial wave and tidal leasing round, for ten sites in Scotland’s Pentland Firth and Orkney waters.

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20 April 2010: Saudi Arabia looks beyond fossil fuels

The Saudi Arabian government has announced that it will pursue nuclear and renewable electricity to meet the country’s rising demand for energy, driven by a rapidly expanding population and industrial base, and a growing need for desalinated water. It is not unusual for a government to announce support for nuclear or renewables, but it is quite striking for the country with the world’s largest known oil reserves, and the fifth largest gas reserves, to be planning to develop alternatives to fossil fuels.

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20 November 2009: the EU and energy efficiency

This week, I have been to Brussels for meetings on energy efficiency, renewables, nuclear and CCS. The now-ratified Lisbon Treaty says that there will, in the future, be a common energy policy, but this is unlikely to have much practical impact, but the EU has achieved much in important areas.

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20 September 2009: How can the EU best meet its 2020 renewables target?

On Thursday, I launched a report I wrote for the Centre for European Reform on how the EU should meet its 2020 target that 20% of all energy should be from renewable sources. Meeting the target would help control climate change, greatly increase EU energy security and create many new jobs and industries.

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2015 General Election manifestos on climate change

Analyses what the parties standing UK-wide are promising to do about climate change.

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2015 Lancet Commission report on health and climate change

Key quotes from, and a few of my comments on, the excellent Lancet Commission report

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2026: Europe’s progressive climate policies

In less than two weeks’ time, the UK will vote on whether to stay in or leave the EU. I am doing all I can for the Stronger In campaign (http://www.strongerin.co.uk/#QkGoYymoqlkpWtIE.97). Opinion polls predict a very close result. Being Labour, I never believe opinion polls. Britain could well vote to leave. But I’m also an […]

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22 January 2010: Renewing and decentralising Iraq’s electricity

This week, the European Union and Iraq signed an agreement to strengthen their energy cooperation in areas such as natural gas, energy security and renewables.

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22 January 2014: Unambitious targets. Time to focus on policies

Today, the European Commission published its proposals for a 2030 climate and energy framework. The targets are not ambitious, but policy makers should now focus on measures rather than numbers.

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23 February 2012: Obama tries again to cut fossil fuel subsidies

President Obama has again asked the US Congress to agree a budget which cuts the more than $40 billion in tax breaks for oil, gas and coal producers over the next decade. The president’s budget proposals are sensible and should be passed by Congress. But they won’t be. The left-right divide on climate in US politics is unnecessary.

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23 February 2017: the patriotic case for climate action

My report on an impressive energy and climate speech from Lib Dem leader Tim Farron which I attended yesterday

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23 October 2009: Dutch and Danish climate progress

On Thursday 22 and Friday 23, I went to Clingendael, the Netherlands Institute for International Relations, for a seminar on how to meet the EU 20% renewables target. It certainly felt ironic for an Englishman to be invited to go and tell the Dutch what to do about renewable energy.

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24 February 2011: European Investment Bank increases lending to climate projects

The European Investment Bank increased its lending to projects to help control climate change to €19bn in 2010. This was a 19% increase over the 2009 figure and meant that climate projects accounted for almost a third of total EIB lending.

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24 February 2014: Coalition subsidies to keep the coal fires burning

The Conservative Party is planning new subsidies for coal power stations. This is a striking historic reversal, because the Tories have traditionally been anti-coal.

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24 January 2011: Greece starts solar expansion

A Greek utility is planning to build a 200Mw solar photovoltaic farm. This is welcome news, though only a faltering first step.

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25 May 2012: How to cut the cost of renewable energy

David Buchan has written a valuable paper on European electricity policy, in which he argues convincingly that harmonising the various national schemes would be more efficienct and so cut costs. The level of subsidy could continue to differ, but the design of the schemes should be made more consistent.

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26 August 2014: Let’s start a European tidal lagoon industry

Energy Post has now published my article on why and how the EU should start to use its tidal resources for energy. This would have major climate, energy security and economic benefits.

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26 October 2014: Europe needs policies to halt coal, not more debate on targets

My article for ‘Responding to Climate Change’ on European governments’ acceptance of Commission proposals for a 2030 climate and energy package.

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27 April 2009: UK Budget 2009

At a time when all the talk is of the need for massive cuts in expenditure, in the Budget on 22 April 2009, the UK Government managed to find some extra money to help control climate change.

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27 December 2011: Commission’s energy roadmap is a missed opportunity

The European Commission should focus on proposing specific policies, rather than modelling different scenarios. It has done well with its energy efficiency proposal; now it should propose strengthening the ETS and setting a 2030 renewables target.

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27 January 2010: France, offshore wind and district heating

The French government has called for tenders for 3Gw of offshore wind off France, and has given a grant to GDF Suez for a district heating network in Paris, which will use renewable heat.

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27 May 2010: UK bills and bonfires

The new UK government has now announced its legislative programme for the next 18 months and there is to be another energy bill. This is a good Bill and should be supported. The government has also announced how it will begin to reduce the deficit.

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27 September: ‘Green Ed’ Miliband

Ed Miliband was a good Energy and Climate Change Secretary, so the UK now has a ‘green’ Prime Minister, ‘green’ Energy Secretary and ‘green’ Leader of the Opposition. Now for some delivery…

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28 June 2011: UK microgeneration strategy

This is a commentary on the UK government’s new microgeneration strategy. It is good that it recognises the need to address non-financial barriers, but lack of strong regulatory framework will not deliver microgeneration or climate protection.

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28 March 2011: Merkel punished for opportunism

Yesterday’s election in the German region Baden-Württemberg, one of Germany’s richest regions, saw Angela Merkel’s CDU lose power after over half a century in office and there can be little doubt that the campaign was heavily influenced by the Japanese nuclear issue.

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29 July 2011: Jonathon Porritt on nuclear power

Comments on Jonathon Porritt’s arguments against nuclear power.

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29 November 2013: politics beating policy in UK and EU

UK energy policy is in utter confusion, but is EU policy any better?

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29 September 2009: Will Merkel II be green?

Angela Merkel’s victory in Germany’s election was not unexpected. What was less clear was who her coalition partner would be, but we now know that it will be the FDP. This party is liberal, in both economic and social senses. It is also very pro-business and in favour of tax cuts and is now arguing for reductions in subsidies.

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3 December 2009: A cleaner North Sea energy hub

Yesterday I went to Brussels for a seminar on CCS with Ruud Lubbers, who used to be prime minister of the Netherlands and is now running the Rotterdam Climate Initiative.

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30 April 2010: US wind to advance offshore

The Obama Administration has given the go ahead for a 468Mw wind farm in Nantucket Sound, off the coast of Massachusetts. This will be the US’s first offshore wind farm and has been delayed in the planning process for almost a decade.

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31 December 2009: Some progress in 2009 – though not nearly enough

The lack of substantial progress at Copenhagen, though not unexpected, has left many people close to despondency on climate change. There is now a serious danger that they will lose interest. More worrying is the danger that the media will lose interest, leading to politicians doing likewise.

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4 January 2010: Europe must follow Germany and Spain

For the next six months, Spain holds the Presidency of the EU and, from the start of February, there will be a new European Commission. Spain and Germany lead the EU on wind and solar power, so there are good grounds to hope that the new leadership will result in a major speeding up of the low carbon transition.

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5 March 2010: Community energy in Scotland

On Wednesday and Thursday, I attended a conference on renewable energy in Scotland, on the stunningly beautiful island Skye. I talked about how to dispel myths about climate change and renewables.

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5 November 2010: Courts block Spanish coal subsidies

Courts have put injunctions on the Spanish government’s plans to subsidise Spanish coal. This is welcome. Subsidies should go to coal with CCS, and to renewables.

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6 January 2012: Response from Philip Lowe on Energy Roadmap

Philip Lowe, the Director General, Energy in the European Commission, has responded to my criticism of the EU’s Energy Roadmap.

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7 December 2009: Copenhagen + Obama = progress?

The Copenhagen Climate Summit starts today. Prospects are looking better than they were a few weeks ago and the fact that President Obama has decided to attend the final negotiating session, rather than just for a token visit at the start, is excellent.

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7 December 2015: UK climate and energy policy: small steps forward, large steps backwards

The advance represented by Energy and Climate Secretary Amber Rudd’s ‘reset’ speech on 18 November has been pretty comprehensively destroyed by Chancellor George Osborne.

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7 January 2010: At last, Scottish grid improvement will be built

Scotland has immense potential to expand renewables, particularly wind and the Scottish National Party (SNP), when it took over the Scottish government in 2007, set a target that half of all Scotland’s electricity should come from renewables by 2020.

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7 January 2014: Energiewende and schadenfreude

The German “Energiewende” is not doing as well as often claimed; but climate protection is too important for point-scoring or schadenfreude.

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7 June 2010: Subsidies should be switched

Low carbon energy sources – renewables, CCS and nuclear – all require public financial support. In the UK, the new government has said that there will be no subsidy for new nuclear power stations. Before the general election, the Conservatives said that there would be no subsidy and the Liberal Democrats remain anti-nuclear. Without financial support, no new nuclear stations will be built. Nor will any renewables or CCS – offshore wind and CCS are, in the view of many, going to be even more expensive than nuclear.

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7 May 2009: Renewables offer way forward in South Asia

President Obama’s meeting with the Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari on 6 May understandably focussed on how to combat the Taliban and control Pakistan’s nuclear weapons.

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7 October 2011: Has Europe given up fighting climate change?

The EU has long prided itself on leading international efforts to control climate change. Today, the issue is nowhere near the top of the EU’s agenda, having been eclipsed by the economic downturn and the eurozone debt crisis.

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7 September 2009: Will Australia make climate progress?

One of Kevin Rudd’s first acts on becoming Australian prime minister was to ratify the Kyoto Protocol, which his predecessor refused to do. Now, he is trying to introduce a cap-and-trade system to help deliver up to a 25% reduction in Australia’s emissions by 2020. This isn’t enough, but it is certainly better than denying the reality of climate change, as many of his opponents still do.

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8 October 2010: US and Iceland co-operate on geothermal energy

It isn’t often worth commenting on the fact that an agreement has been signed. Too many politicians make too many promises about what they plan to do in the future. However, a co-operation agreement between the US, the world’s top polluter, and Iceland, the world leader on geothermal energy use, is an exception.

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9 April 2012: The EU Budget

The Centre for European Reform has now published a short paper by John Peet, who is Europe editor of the Economist, and me on the EU Budget.

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9 February 2011: EU ‘energy summit’

The EU summit on 4 February, billed as an Energy Summit, said little new or unexpected. The forthcoming Energy Efficiency Action Plan must be much more ambitious.

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Antarctic Blog – 14 March 2009

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USHUAIA, ARGENTINA. Roald Amundsen, growing up in Norway, dreamt of going to the North Pole. Later, when he led the first team to the South Pole, he wrote in his diary, “How topsy turvy is that?”

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Antarctica Blog – 15 March 2009

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BEAGLE PASSAGE, ARGENTINA. Today was a perfect day for walking – light cloud and much less wind than yesterday. We set off, straight after breakfast, to walk up to the place where there used to be a glacier.

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Being pro-nuclear does not undermine climate and energy goals

Our response to Sussex Uni. Being pro-nuclear does not effect decarbonisation and renewables. It doesn’t matter to the climate how we decarbonise, it just matters that we do.

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Brexit and Energy: cost, security and climate policy implications

The UCL Institute for Sustainable Resources and the UCL European Institute have released a new paper on Brexit and the impact on UK climate and energy policy. This paper, written by Professor Michael Grubb, UCL ISR and Stephen Tindale, Director, Alvin Weinberg Foundation analyses the implications of Brexit for the UK’s energy sector. Despite significant uncertainties, the […]

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Carbon and energy taxes in Europe

The demand to ‘make the polluter pay’ by putting a price on the amount of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases produced has been a major point of discussion and debate across Europe since the mid-1980s. This article summarises carbon and energy taxes existing in European countries and how effective they have been.

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Cleaning the neighbourhood: How the EU can scrub out bad energy policy

The EU should not buy electricity from countries with highly-polluting coal power stations, and should instead support efficiency and clean energy in these countries.

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Climate action is more important than the single market

CER has now published my policy brief on ‘State aid and energy: climate action is more important than the single market’.

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Comments to European Commission on Hinkley and state aid

My comments to the European Commission, saying that it should approve the UK government’s application to sign a contract with EDF energy to build a new nuclear power station.

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Director Stephen Tindale’s evidence to Lord’s Committee

Our Director Stephen Tindale gave oral evidence on the economics of UK energy policy to the House of Lord’s Economic Affairs Committee on 15 November. He argued for a more diverse energy mix, more consistent policy and more rapid decision making on key issues. The Chancellor’s Autumn Statement said little about energy. The spring 2017 […]

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Electric vehicles

smart-car1

In my opinion, electric vehicles should be strongly supported. Those concerned about climate change too often take an overly anti-car position.

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Financing and delivering a new energy infrastructure

This is a summary of a longer paper by Prashant Vaze and Ed Mayo on how a new, low-carbon energy infrastructure can be financed at reasonable cost.

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Floating wind-farms – unlocking energy on the ocean

floating wind pic

Harnessing the world’s wind has developed into one of the most successful methods for generating renewable electricity and now floating wind-farms present even greater opportunities.

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General Election Manifestos 2010: Conservative, Labour, Liberal Democrats and Greens on Electricity and Heat

Manifesto

All three main UK parties take climate seriously and promise to reduce emissions and expand low-carbon energy. They all recognise the energy security and employment benefits. This article includes quotations from the relevant parts of the manifestos of the three main parties on heat and electricity – energy efficiency, fuel poverty and energy production.

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German policy on wind and solar power

German sheep and PV panels

Germany led the world on wind energy until 2007. In 2008, it was overtaken in terms of total installed capacity, though not percentage of energy coming from wind, by the USA. It remains the world’s top photovoltaic (PV) installer, accounting for almost half of the global market in 2007 – though this generates only about 1% of total electricity used in Germany.

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Green policies of the US federal government and states

The US federal government passed energy acts in 2005, 2007 and 2008, each aiming to increase energy efficiency and expand renewables. The 2009 Recovery Act also had money for these, However, to get a clear picture of American energy policy, we need to look not just at federal programs, but also at what state governments are doing.

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How community benefits from shale gas could work

Consultancy Remsol has today published a constructive Blueprint for shale gas community benefits. (http://www.remsol.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Remsol-A-Blueprint-for-Shale-Gas-Community-Benefits-09082016.pdf ). I wrote the foreword: “UK shale gas production could and should be part of a low-carbon transition, enabling Britain to phase out coal more quickly while strengthening energy security. Domestically-extracted shale gas would be less climate-damaging than coal, but also than […]

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How green are the Labour Candidates?

What can we expect from the new labour leader in terms of energy and climate policy?

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How to reduce dependence on Russian gas

My CER blog on how Europe should reduce its dependence on Russian gas

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In Defence of Pragmatism

Climate campaigners should be more pragmatic and more prepared to make compromises. Pragmatism often delivers progress; idealism rarely does.

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Italy must lead energy efficiency and renewable production worldwide

Montalto PV plant

As a result of its energy efficiency indicators and the expansion of its renewable programme, Italy has the capacity to lead worldwide production of renewable energy and set standards for an efficient model.

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Making Britain a real low-carbon leader

Tidal Lagoon Power’s proposal for Swansea Bay is the most exciting project that I have been involved in for many years.

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Myths about climate change and renewable energy, and how to debunk them

Myths

There are several myths or misunderstandings that have grown up surrounding climate change and renewable energy. Both sides of the debate can be at fault. This article tries to debunk some of nonsense that is often cited as fact.

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Nuclear energy, no thanks – we’ll do it ourselves

Three months after the Fukashima nuclear reactor caught fire, Germany decided to phase out nuclear power. The decision stunned Europe’s energy policy community. Nuclear presently provides a quarter of Germany’s electricity – how would it plug the gap?

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October 2015: Committee on Climate Change report on electricity scenarios

The Committee on Climate Change sensibly calls for an ‘all of the above’ approach to decarbonisation.

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Paqueta: a community running almost entirely on renewables

Paqueta: a community running almost entirely on renewables

A small island in Rio bay already gets most of its energy from renewables. It should move to become totally powered by solar, biogas and imported hydroelectricity.

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Policies and performance in Obama’s first year

obama

How well have Obama and Energy Secretary Chu done so far on promoting energy efficiency, renewables, CCS and electric vehicles? A very positive assessment is made by the Center for American Progress.

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Prospects for biomass in the UK

The UK government is strongly supportive of biomass as a means of increasing energy security. It also regards biomass as a major contributor to meeting the UK’s EU renewable energy target, and as an important contributor to carbon reductions – though it has stressed that not all biomass is sustainable.

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Question: Can we build enough nuclear power stations and will the nuclear industry turn them off when they are not needed?

Question mark #2

Will it be possible to build all the necessary nuclear power stations in time, what emission savings can be made and will the nuclear industry close them down when and if they are not needed?

Shaun Bernie

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Renewable heat

biogas-plant

People often use the word ‘energy’ when they actually mean electricity. Only 20% of EU energy consumption is electricity (although this will rise as transport becomes increasingly electric.). The rest is for heat and for transport and, therefore, it is essential to expand renewable heat very substantially.

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Repowering Communities case study: Community-owned renewables in the UK

Community-owned renewables are quite rare in the UK, but extremely common – mainly wind farms – in Germany and Denmark. The UK is at least now moving in the right direction, albeit slowly.

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Repowering Communities case study: District heating in Sheffield and Aberdeen

UK district heating schemes is an idea whose time has come. Those in Sheffield and Aberdeen are discussed in this article.

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Repowering Communities case study: Freiburg

Freiburg has a well-deserved reputation as Germany’s green capital. It uses on about half of the energy that other European cities of 200,000 people do, and has become a world leader in solar. This article looks at what the city council has done to achieve this.

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Repowering Communities case study: Gigha

This is a case study of the Gigha community-owned wind farm in Scotland, carried out by Simon Dresner. Comments are welcome.

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Repowering communities case study: Rotterdam

Rotterdam is now Europe’s largest port. It has a concentration of heavy industry, including oil refineries and power stations. So its contribution to climate emissions is substantial.

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Repowering Communities case study: Upper Austria

Austrian regions (Länder) play a significant role in energy, particularly regarding building efficiency and heating, including district heating. Upper Austria is one of nine regions, covering 12,000km2, with 1.4 million inhabitants. It is highly industrialised, with significant heavy industry (manufacture of steel and machinery).

This article is about how Upper Austria manages to get a third of its total energy use, and almost half its heat, from renewables.

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Repowering Communities case study: Vermont

Tiny Vermont is the second smallest state in the US by population and the fifth smallest by area. Its economic reconstruction efforts are understated. So too are its efforts to provide its homes and businesses with sustainable heat and power.

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Repowering communities: Local solutions to a global problem

This is a paper that the three authors of the Repowering Communities book discussed with UK government officials and other experts at a seminar on 1 November 2010. It covers examples of which local governments are doing best on energy efficiency and renewables, and makes some recommendations.

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Solar power for a Saharan school

This is the report, by the head teacher of Gillespie School in the UK, of his visit to a school in Niger. Climate Answers has paid for solar lighting at this school.

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South Africa and climate change

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The ANC government has connected 80% of all South Africans to the electricity grid – one of its greatest successes. However, this mass electrification programme, combined with strong economic growth and rapid industrialisation, meant that demand for power outstripped supply in early 2008.

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The case for a Clean Energy Alliance

The low-carbon energy sectors – efficiency, most renewables, CCS and nuclear – should work together more strategically

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The climate case for shale gas

Shale gas

For climate and air quality reasons, we need more gas. Shale gas is less bad than liquified natural gas – and better than coal.

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The impact of Brexit on clean energy

What will be the impact of Brexit on clean energy in the UK? Answer: nobody knows, because nothing is remotely clear in British politics now. Who will be prime minister? Will there be an early general election? What will be the relationship between the UK and the remaining EU member-states? Will there even be a […]

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The UK’s Energy White Paper and Renewables Roadmap

This is a summary and analysis of UK’s white paper on Electricity Market Reform and Renewables Roadmap, published this week.

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UK Budget 2009: Some good news for the climate from the UK

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Despite the grim economic context, the UK Government managed to find some extra money to help control climate change.

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What the new Conservative government means for UK energy policy

Tory manifesto indicates no major change in energy policy, with exception of end to subsidy for onshore wind. But UK engagement with EU energy union looking less likely.

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Why can’t we get to clean energy without using nuclear power?

Why can’t we get to clean energy without using nuclear power?

Russell Frerichs

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Would ocean thermal energy conversion be a great sustainable technology for harnessing the stored solar power in the oceans?

Question: Would OTEC – ocean thermal energy conversion – be a great solution for harnessing the stored solar power in the oceans?

Fachina

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