Articles containing the tag ‘CCS’

1 April 2010: Poland and CCS

This week, I have been to Poland to talk at a Demos Europa conference on CCS in that country. Poland has the ninth largest global coal reserves, but does not have significant oil or gas reserves. In 2006, 93% of its electricity came from coal and 91% of its heat, so 58.5% of total energy was from coal. Its economy is growing, despite the recession, and a significant number of existing coal stations will have to close over the next 15 years.

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1 December 2009: Controlling fuel poverty during the transition

It will be cheaper to control climate change than not to control it, as the Stern Review memorably said. However, that does not mean that it will be cheap.

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1 March 2010: What the EU should do about CCS

This morning, the Centre for European Reform (www.cer.org.uk) launched the report, which Simon Tilford and I have written, about what the EU should do about CCS. We argue that large-scale demonstration will require public money, and that widespread and rapid deployment will require regulation, ideally at European level.

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10 May 2010: Can the climate wait for democracy?

The world faces an urgent climate crisis. There is no time to lose. However, the UK general election has produced no winner and, at the time of writing, it is still not clear who will form the next government.

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12 November 2009: Good on renewables and nuclear, less good on coal

On 9 November Ed Miliband, the UK Energy and Climate Change Secretary, published National Policy Statements outlining the government policy on energy. These are intended as guidance to the new Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC), which, from next March, is due to grant or refuse planning permission on major energy and transport infrastructure projects. The statements are good on renewables, nuclear and electricity networks, but less good on coal.

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12 October 2009: In UK, excellent news on Kingsnorth and greater honesty on energy costs, but a step change still needed

Last Friday Eon, announced that it is postponing its plan to build a new power station in Kent that would have demonstrated that carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology can be retrofitted. The same day, the energy regulator, the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (Ofgem), published a report accepting that energy prices would have to increase, but would increase much less under a move to low-carbon energy than under a scenario under which the UK relies on gas and oil. And today, the Committee on Climate Change launches its first report on how the UK is doing on meetings its carbon budgets – basic message: ‘not nearly well enough’.

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13 August 2010: Obama’s impressive response to Congress blocking cap-and-trade

The US Congress broke up for the summer without any progress on climate or energy legislation. The chances of getting any legislative progress on cap-and-trade, which have been small for some time, now look miniscule. However, rather than giving up, the Obama administration has responded with three actions that are signs of serious commitment.

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13 December 2013: UK energy policy going very badly

Friday the 13th – and reasons to be gloomy about UK energy policy

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13 May 2010: A new UK government

The UK has a new government and the prospects for climate policy are mixed. The promised policies on aviation and coal are stronger than those of the former Labour government. The approach to renewables is similar to that of Labour. However, the approach on nuclear power looks like a recipe for muddle and delay.

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14 January 2010: Is the EU good for business?

Today, I attended a conference organised by Business for a New Europe and the Centre for European Reform on Is the EU good for business?. The general answers was (unsurprisingly, given the organisers) ‘yes, generally, but could be better’.

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14 July 2009: ‘Pick and mix’ approach won’t control climate change

On Monday, 13 July 2009, Ed Miliband, the UK Energy and Climate Change Secretary, opened the Little Cheyne Court wind farm in Kent. With a capacity of just under 60Mw, this is the largest wind farm in South East England.

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14 May 2014: My Economist Insight on why we need all clean energy sources

The Economist has published my short article on why we need energy efficiency plus all clean energy sources: renewables, carbon capture and storage and nuclear.

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15 September 2011: Which is worse, gas or nuclear?

Is gas sufficiently low-carbon to be an adequate bridge technology? No – it’s emissions for every unit of electricity produced are over three times as high as emissions from nuclear power.

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17 December 2010: More (promised) progress from UK government

UK Energy Secretary, Chris Huhne, has proposed a radical overhaul of the UK’s electricity market. This is good news, but the government must do more to combat fuel poverty.

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17 July 2009: UK low-carbon transition plan

On Wednesday 15 July 2009, the UK government published its plan to make the UK a low carbon economy. It is good on electricity, quite good on energy efficiency and heat, but bad on transport.

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17 November 2009: Hu and Obama talk climate

Presidents Hu and Obama met today in Beijing and climate change was high on the agenda. China and the US are now the two largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, responsible for over a third of total annual global emissions – though the US has caused 30% of the total historical contribution, whereas China has contributed just 7%, and US per capita emissions are 23.5 tons, whereas China’s are 5.5 tons.

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18 April 2010: UK manifestos and climate proposals

The manifestos of the three main UK political parties, Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat, all agree that climate change is an extremely serious issue and that tackling it can be done in ways which enhance energy security and strengthen the UK economy.

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18 February 2010: Obama builds bridges through technology

In November 2009, 3% of OECD electricity was generated by renewables other than hydro. 14% came from hydro. And this was only 17% of what electricity was then used, not total energy used.

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18 January 2010: Obama’s first year

President Obama has done more to control climate change than President Bush ever did. However, that is hardly setting the bar very high.

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19 March 2014: Setting standards

It’s time for energy policy wonks to move beyond the TLAs (three letter acronyms) and talk human.

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19 November 2015: Well done Amber Rudd

UK climate and energy policy are not perfect, but are in significantly better shape this morning than they were yesterday morning

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2 April 2012: UK struggling with low-carbon bridge technologies

The UK is running another competition on CCS. But practical progress so far has been precisely zero. And Eon and RWE have pulled out of their UK nuclear joint venture. So there’s a real risk that the UK will experience another ‘dash for gas’ without CCS.

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20 November 2009: the EU and energy efficiency

This week, I have been to Brussels for meetings on energy efficiency, renewables, nuclear and CCS. The now-ratified Lisbon Treaty says that there will, in the future, be a common energy policy, but this is unlikely to have much practical impact, but the EU has achieved much in important areas.

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2015 Lancet Commission report on health and climate change

Key quotes from, and a few of my comments on, the excellent Lancet Commission report

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22 November 2014: my interview with CFO of Shell

Simon Henry, Chief Finance Officer of Shell, spoke at the launch of my policy brief on international climate negotiations. Afterwards I interviewed him for CER’s website.

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22 October 2010: UK Spending Review – not too bad, but open goal missed

The UK government has cut spending on climate schemes less than it has cut most other schemes. But is has cut local government grants by more than a quarter, so local government must play a greater role on energy efficiency schemes. In addition, the government should have made winter fuel payments means-tested.

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23 June 2009: Can coal ever be clean?

Burning coal is an extremely damaging way to generate electricity. Coal has a very high carbon content, so is a major source of greenhouse gasses. Burning it also results in pollutants that are directly damaging to human health, such as sulphur dioxide.

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24 February 2011: European Investment Bank increases lending to climate projects

The European Investment Bank increased its lending to projects to help control climate change to €19bn in 2010. This was a 19% increase over the 2009 figure and meant that climate projects accounted for almost a third of total EIB lending.

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24 February 2014: Coalition subsidies to keep the coal fires burning

The Conservative Party is planning new subsidies for coal power stations. This is a striking historic reversal, because the Tories have traditionally been anti-coal.

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24 March 2010: Norway leads

Last week, the Norwegian government announced that it is on track to meet its new renewables target for 2011. On the face of it, this isn’t significant. However, Norway is significant on climate change and has played a major role in climate policy for many years.

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24 March 2011: UK Budget – two and a half steps forward, one and a half back

Yesterday’s UK Budget wasn’t that bad for climate protection, although it wasn’t nearly as good as it should have been. Announcements on energy and the promised Green Investment Bank were quite good, but those on transport were awful.

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24 October 2016: my recent work on shale gas

Last week the Sun published an article by me on shale gas https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1997618/as-a-lifelong-green-im-convinced-frackings-the-only-solution-to-energy-problems/. The journalist I worked with on the text was excellent, and I had full editorial control. In the article I say that shale gas is part of the answer. The headline writer then wrote that I think it is “the only solution”. I don’t. […]

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26 April 2010: Climate event for UK General Election

This morning I attended an event called ‘Ask a Climate Question’ organised by a coalition of environment and development groups. The most striking aspect of the discussion was that, with the exception of nuclear power, there was broad consensus among the four parties.

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26 April 2012: Germany planning several new fossil fuel plants

Germany is planning several new coal and gas power stations – without CCS – to replace its nuclear stations. This is bad for the climate and also a waste of money.

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26 January 2010: UK policy on clean business

Yesterday, I attended a talk by Pat McFadden, a minister in the UK’s Business Department, about how the UK should move to a low-carbon economy. His main point was that the UK is still a manufacturing economy, despite the common view that everything manufactured is now imported. He also talked about the enormous opportunity for people in the UK to make wind turbines.

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27 May 2010: UK bills and bonfires

The new UK government has now announced its legislative programme for the next 18 months and there is to be another energy bill. This is a good Bill and should be supported. The government has also announced how it will begin to reduce the deficit.

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27 September: ‘Green Ed’ Miliband

Ed Miliband was a good Energy and Climate Change Secretary, so the UK now has a ‘green’ Prime Minister, ‘green’ Energy Secretary and ‘green’ Leader of the Opposition. Now for some delivery…

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28 March 2011: Merkel punished for opportunism

Yesterday’s election in the German region Baden-Württemberg, one of Germany’s richest regions, saw Angela Merkel’s CDU lose power after over half a century in office and there can be little doubt that the campaign was heavily influenced by the Japanese nuclear issue.

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29 December 2009: Geoengineering – plan A+

In the words of Nobel-prize winning chemist Paul Crutzen, we live in a new geological era – the anthropocene. He chose this name because, since the industrial revolution, the human influence on climate has been so great that we are already engineering the climate, albeit not deliberately.

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29 July 2011: Jonathon Porritt on nuclear power

Comments on Jonathon Porritt’s arguments against nuclear power.

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29 July 2016: Open letter to Greg Clark MP on Hinkley review

Dear Greg, Congratulations on your appointment to run BEIS. I welcome the creation of the new department (see http://climateanswers.info/2016/07/15-july-2016-new-british-government-a-step-forward-for-climate-strategy/). And it is great to have you back working on energy and climate change. I also welcome your decision to review the Hinkley Point C proposal, following yesterday’s Final Investment Decision by EDF. The UK needs […]

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29 November 2013: politics beating policy in UK and EU

UK energy policy is in utter confusion, but is EU policy any better?

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29 October 2009: Obama acts smart, Norwegians act Global

President Obama has unveiled a $3.4 billion programme to upgrade the US electricity grid, turning it into a ‘smart grid’. This will make it more efficient, so that less energy is lost during transmission and distribution, and it will be easier to harness renewables, including intermittent ones like wind and solar.

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29 September 2009: Will Merkel II be green?

Angela Merkel’s victory in Germany’s election was not unexpected. What was less clear was who her coalition partner would be, but we now know that it will be the FDP. This party is liberal, in both economic and social senses. It is also very pro-business and in favour of tax cuts and is now arguing for reductions in subsidies.

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3 December 2009: A cleaner North Sea energy hub

Yesterday I went to Brussels for a seminar on CCS with Ruud Lubbers, who used to be prime minister of the Netherlands and is now running the Rotterdam Climate Initiative.

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31 December 2009: Some progress in 2009 – though not nearly enough

The lack of substantial progress at Copenhagen, though not unexpected, has left many people close to despondency on climate change. There is now a serious danger that they will lose interest. More worrying is the danger that the media will lose interest, leading to politicians doing likewise.

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31 July 2010: European Commission sensible on coal subsidies, but not on nuclear fusion

The European Commission has done well in securing some – though not nearly enough – money to support renewables and CCS from the European economic recovery plan and from auctioning permits under the EU’s emissions trading scheme. By comparison, EU countries paid out €3 billion in national coal subsidies in 2008 alone. All OECD countries together give $400 billion every year in subsidies to fossil fuels, compared with $45 billion to nuclear and $27 billion to renewables, according to the International Energy Agency.

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4 February 2010: Substantial EU progress on CCS

On Tuesday 2 February 2010, European Union member states agreed to European Commission proposals on how to distribute billions of Euros collected under the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) to CCS and renewable energy projects.

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4 January 2010: Europe must follow Germany and Spain

For the next six months, Spain holds the Presidency of the EU and, from the start of February, there will be a new European Commission. Spain and Germany lead the EU on wind and solar power, so there are good grounds to hope that the new leadership will result in a major speeding up of the low carbon transition.

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5 November 2009: $26 billion for US rail

Warren Buffet, the iconic investor who has proved time and again that it is quite possible to ‘pick winners’, has made his biggest investment so far – $26 billion in one of the main rail operators in the US, Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF). It is good news that Buffet regards rail as a future winner.

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5 October 2009: Ireland votes for a more effective EU

The Irish have voted to accept the Lisbon Treaty so, unless the Czech Republic or Poland decide unexpectedly to refuse to do so, the Treaty of Lisbon will come into force. This will not have a significant direct effect on climate and energy policy, but it will enable to EU to focus on more important things rather than endless institutional wrangling.

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6 April 2010: The UK general election – climate and money

Today, the general election campaign will almost certainly begin formally, though, in practice, it has been well underway all year.

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7 December 2009: Copenhagen + Obama = progress?

The Copenhagen Climate Summit starts today. Prospects are looking better than they were a few weeks ago and the fact that President Obama has decided to attend the final negotiating session, rather than just for a token visit at the start, is excellent.

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7 December 2015: UK climate and energy policy: small steps forward, large steps backwards

The advance represented by Energy and Climate Secretary Amber Rudd’s ‘reset’ speech on 18 November has been pretty comprehensively destroyed by Chancellor George Osborne.

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7 January 2014: Energiewende and schadenfreude

The German “Energiewende” is not doing as well as often claimed; but climate protection is too important for point-scoring or schadenfreude.

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7 June 2010: Subsidies should be switched

Low carbon energy sources – renewables, CCS and nuclear – all require public financial support. In the UK, the new government has said that there will be no subsidy for new nuclear power stations. Before the general election, the Conservatives said that there would be no subsidy and the Liberal Democrats remain anti-nuclear. Without financial support, no new nuclear stations will be built. Nor will any renewables or CCS – offshore wind and CCS are, in the view of many, going to be even more expensive than nuclear.

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7 May 2009: Renewables offer way forward in South Asia

President Obama’s meeting with the Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari on 6 May understandably focussed on how to combat the Taliban and control Pakistan’s nuclear weapons.

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7 October 2011: Has Europe given up fighting climate change?

The EU has long prided itself on leading international efforts to control climate change. Today, the issue is nowhere near the top of the EU’s agenda, having been eclipsed by the economic downturn and the eurozone debt crisis.

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8 November 2011: European Climate Foundation roadmap

Comment on the launch of the European Climate Foundation’s latest report, Power Perspectives 2030.

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8 October 2009: Paying for the US low-carbon transition

The US budget deficit has more than tripled to a record $1.4trn (£877bn, €948bn) in the year to 30 September 2009, due to increased government spending and a big drop in tax revenues. So, how is the US going to pay for a transition to a low-carbon economy?

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9 April 2010: A woeful World Bank decision

We try to be optimistic and positive at Climate Answers; to emphasise what we support rather than what we oppose. However, that doesn’t mean that there aren’t things to oppose and condemn, and yesterday’s decision by the World Bank to give a $3.75 billion loan for a coal power station in South Africa is certainly one of them.

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9 December 2009: Small steps in the UK budget, much larger ones in the US

UK Chancellor of the Exchequer, Alistair Darling, today gave his pre-budget report to parliament. This included some good climate measures.

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9 March 2011: European Commission’s Energy Efficiency Plan

The European Commission published its Energy Efficiency Plan yesterday. It isn’t bad, and calls for combined heat and power to be made mandatory in some cases. The plan should be implemented without delay.

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Carbon capture and storage

This diagram was taken from the Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage website.

Coal has a very high carbon content, so is a major source of greenhouse gasses and the economic costs of polluting the atmosphere are not borne by the polluter, In economic jargon, ‘the externalities are not internalised’.

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Carbon capture and storage: EU advancing, but not fast enough

The EU has made some progress on large scale CCS demonstration projects, but needs to speed up.

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CCS: an obvious solution to the energy dilemmas of Poland?

With around 95% of its electricity generated from coal, Poland comes up higher in coal statistics than Australia, the US, South Africa or even China. The coal intensity of electricity generation in Poland is not only a legacy from the past, but also a conscious choice of consecutive Polish governments. As the most abundant energy resource in the country, coal is considered an important pillar of Poland’s energy security. And yet, despite the central position of coal for the energy sector and the environmental pressure from Brussels, there is little enthusiasm for CCS technology among Polish decision-makers and energy sector stakeholders.

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CCS: What the EU needs to do – Part 1

CCS

Coal will be the biggest single source of electricity for decades to come. Yet the EU is doing far too little to encourage the take-up of carbon capture and storage, a technology which could make coal a low-carbon fuel. This failure threatens not only Europe’s leadership of global climate change policy but also its ability to profit from the emergence of a huge global market for equipment and expertise. Stephen Tindale and Simon Tilford argue that more public money is needed for the construction of demonstration projects, while regulation and strong market signals will be required to ensure mass deployment of the technology.

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CCS: What the EU needs to do – Part 2

CCS

Coal will be the biggest single source of electricity for decades to come. Yet the EU is doing far too little to encourage the take-up of carbon capture and storage, a technology which could make coal a low-carbon fuel. This failure threatens not only Europe’s leadership of global climate change policy but also its ability to profit from the emergence of a huge global market for equipment and expertise. Stephen Tindale and Simon Tilford argue that more public money is needed for the construction of demonstration projects, while regulation and strong market signals will be required to ensure mass deployment of the technology.

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Cleaning the neighbourhood: How the EU can scrub out bad energy policy

The EU should not buy electricity from countries with highly-polluting coal power stations, and should instead support efficiency and clean energy in these countries.

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Climate action is more important than the single market

CER has now published my policy brief on ‘State aid and energy: climate action is more important than the single market’.

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Director Stephen Tindale’s evidence to Lord’s Committee

Our Director Stephen Tindale gave oral evidence on the economics of UK energy policy to the House of Lord’s Economic Affairs Committee on 15 November. He argued for a more diverse energy mix, more consistent policy and more rapid decision making on key issues. The Chancellor’s Autumn Statement said little about energy. The spring 2017 […]

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General Election Manifestos 2010: Conservative, Labour, Liberal Democrats and Greens on Electricity and Heat

Manifesto

All three main UK parties take climate seriously and promise to reduce emissions and expand low-carbon energy. They all recognise the energy security and employment benefits. This article includes quotations from the relevant parts of the manifestos of the three main parties on heat and electricity – energy efficiency, fuel poverty and energy production.

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Geoengineering

geoengineering_300

Geoengineering is the term given to proposals to try to control the climate through technologies, some of them new and bizarre, and unlikely to happen or to work if they did, some of them are new ways of applying old approaches and some of them new but likely to work.

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German policy on wind and solar power

German sheep and PV panels

Germany led the world on wind energy until 2007. In 2008, it was overtaken in terms of total installed capacity, though not percentage of energy coming from wind, by the USA. It remains the world’s top photovoltaic (PV) installer, accounting for almost half of the global market in 2007 – though this generates only about 1% of total electricity used in Germany.

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How green are the Labour Candidates?

What can we expect from the new labour leader in terms of energy and climate policy?

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How low-carbon are different generating technologies?

Wind energy

No form of electricity generation is entirely free of carbon emissions. So just how carbon free are the main types?

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How the EU can speed up CCS

BRITAIN DIDCOT POWER PLANT

Rapid and extensive demonstration of carbon capture and storage (CCS) is necessary to show that it works as well at larger scales as it does at smaller scales, and that it works throughout the generation, capture, transport and storage process.

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How to reduce dependence on Russian gas

My CER blog on how Europe should reduce its dependence on Russian gas

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In Defence of Pragmatism

Climate campaigners should be more pragmatic and more prepared to make compromises. Pragmatism often delivers progress; idealism rarely does.

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Myths about climate change and renewable energy, and how to debunk them

Myths

There are several myths or misunderstandings that have grown up surrounding climate change and renewable energy. Both sides of the debate can be at fault. This article tries to debunk some of nonsense that is often cited as fact.

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October 2015: Committee on Climate Change report on electricity scenarios

The Committee on Climate Change sensibly calls for an ‘all of the above’ approach to decarbonisation.

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Policies and performance in Obama’s first year

obama

How well have Obama and Energy Secretary Chu done so far on promoting energy efficiency, renewables, CCS and electric vehicles? A very positive assessment is made by the Center for American Progress.

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Political and economic pressure may be the only solution for Canada

alberta-tar-sands-2

Climate change is a contentious topic in Canada, largely due to the nation’s long-standing ties to the fossil fuel industry. At the forefront of Canadian discourse on this topic is the Province of Alberta’s famous “dirty” tar sands oil production. This is followed closely by the coal-fired electricity industry. From a high-level perspective, these two well-established, carbon-intensive industries, combined with the provincial and federal governments’ reluctance to limit their emissions in a meaningful way, form the basis upon which Canada has historically failed to engage in climate change discussions and continues to fail to significantly address climate change.

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Question: Does the fact that natural gas may be abundant change the environmental position?

Question mark #2

What about boring old natural gas? I can’t find any mention of it anywhere on your site and I wonder how much you or your readers know about the recent revolution in unconventional “shale” gas which has meant some geologists think that there is nine times more natural gas available on a planetary scale than thought as little as two or three years ago.

Nick Grealy

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Question: What about nuclear fusion?

Question mark #2

Apart from CCS, there is much good sense on all sides of the debate on measures to reduce carbon emissions. Why haven’t you mentioned the ultimate medium term opportunity – nuclear fusion?

Leighton Upton

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Repowering communities

People power

I am writing a book, with Prashant Vaze and Peter Meyer on the role that local, regional and state governments should play in increasing energy efficiency and promoting low carbon energy. This will be published by Earthscan in 2011.

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Repowering communities case study: Rotterdam

Rotterdam is now Europe’s largest port. It has a concentration of heavy industry, including oil refineries and power stations. So its contribution to climate emissions is substantial.

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The carbon crunch: how we’re getting climate change wrong – and how to fix it by Dieter Helm

Dieter Helm, professor of energy policy at Oxford University, is a leading voice in European energy policy. During 2011, he acted as a special adviser to energy commissioner Gunther Oettinger. Helm has now written a new book: The carbon crunch: how we’re getting climate change wrong – and how to fix it.

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The case for a Clean Energy Alliance

The low-carbon energy sectors – efficiency, most renewables, CCS and nuclear – should work together more strategically

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The climate case for shale gas

Shale gas

For climate and air quality reasons, we need more gas. Shale gas is less bad than liquified natural gas – and better than coal.

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The EU budget: the Union risks having the wrong debate

The EU should spend less money on agriculture and more on improving the econommies of poorer member-states and on climate protection.

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The EU must support clean energy, not dirty coal

The European Commission has proposed that subsidies to hard coal should be phased out by 2014. This is good, but must be agreed by EU national governments, some of whom will almost certainly try to extend the deadline.

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The Hydrogen Economy

Hydrogen gas is increasingly discussed as the “fuel for the future” but what are the opportunities and challenges.

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The UK’s Energy White Paper and Renewables Roadmap

This is a summary and analysis of UK’s white paper on Electricity Market Reform and Renewables Roadmap, published this week.

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UK planning statements on energy, November 2009

Plot of land for sale

Yesterday (9 November 2008), the UK Energy and Climate Change Secretary, Ed Miliband, published National Policy Statements (NPS) outlining the government policy on energy. They consist of guidance to the new Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC), which, from next March, is due to grant or refuse planning permission on major energy and transport infrastructure projects. The statements are area a mixed bag – good on renewables, nuclear and electricity networks, but less good on coal.

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Why can’t we get to clean energy without using nuclear power?

Why can’t we get to clean energy without using nuclear power?

Russell Frerichs

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