Articles containing the tag ‘decarbonisation’

11 June 2009: Re-solarisation

The need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is usually referred to as ‘decarbonisation’. Jonathan Porritt, the chairman of the UK Sustainable Development Commission, thinks that it is better to call it “re-solarisation”, because this is positive and solar power has immense potential.

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13 January 2011: US EPA accepts that not all biomass is good

The US EPA is to issue guidelines on which forms of biomass are sustainable and which not. This is some progress, but the Scottish government is doing much better, issuing mandatory standards in April 2011.

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14 May 2014: A new narrative for European integration

Swiss paper Le Temps has now published (in French) my article on the need for a new narrative for European integration. Here is the English version.

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14 May 2014: My Economist Insight on why we need all clean energy sources

The Economist has published my short article on why we need energy efficiency plus all clean energy sources: renewables, carbon capture and storage and nuclear.

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15 September 2011: Which is worse, gas or nuclear?

Is gas sufficiently low-carbon to be an adequate bridge technology? No – it’s emissions for every unit of electricity produced are over three times as high as emissions from nuclear power.

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17 December 2010: More (promised) progress from UK government

UK Energy Secretary, Chris Huhne, has proposed a radical overhaul of the UK’s electricity market. This is good news, but the government must do more to combat fuel poverty.

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17 July 2009: UK low-carbon transition plan

On Wednesday 15 July 2009, the UK government published its plan to make the UK a low carbon economy. It is good on electricity, quite good on energy efficiency and heat, but bad on transport.

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17 September 2014: For climate protection, money is more important than targets.

In my new CER paper I argue that international climate negotiations should focus on money not targets. So the G20 is a better forum than the UN is.

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18 February 2010: Obama builds bridges through technology

In November 2009, 3% of OECD electricity was generated by renewables other than hydro. 14% came from hydro. And this was only 17% of what electricity was then used, not total energy used.

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18 January 2017: Why the Swansea tidal lagoon should be supported

Last week the former energy minister Charles Hendry published his review on tidal lagoons (https://hendryreview.wordpress.com/) I am a consultant to Tidal Lagoon Power (TLP), so not disinterested. But I think that anyone reading the report will recognise it as an extensive, evidence-based and therefore serious review. Hendry was in my view a good energy minister […]

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19 August 2015: Europe needs more gas so should develop shale gas

My article for Interfax Global Energy on why shale gas is part of the way forward for climate and energy policy.

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2015 Lancet Commission report on health and climate change

Key quotes from, and a few of my comments on, the excellent Lancet Commission report

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23 February 2017: the patriotic case for climate action

My report on an impressive energy and climate speech from Lib Dem leader Tim Farron which I attended yesterday

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26 August 2014: Let’s start a European tidal lagoon industry

Energy Post has now published my article on why and how the EU should start to use its tidal resources for energy. This would have major climate, energy security and economic benefits.

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3 December 2009: A cleaner North Sea energy hub

Yesterday I went to Brussels for a seminar on CCS with Ruud Lubbers, who used to be prime minister of the Netherlands and is now running the Rotterdam Climate Initiative.

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31 May 2016: The EU and domestic energy bills

Vote Leave is today claiming that, if the UK leaves the EU, domestic energy bills would be lower. They are wrong. Domestic energy bills could and should be reduced by changing taxes and tariffs. It is possible to do this without leaving the EU. Quitting the European Internal Energy Market – the single market for […]

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8 November 2011: European Climate Foundation roadmap

Comment on the launch of the European Climate Foundation’s latest report, Power Perspectives 2030.

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Australian ETS chaos

Australia-Global-Warming

So climate change has claimed a political victim in Australia and you don’t know whether to laugh or cry…

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Bioenergy: Panacea or Pandora’s box?

bioenerg

The case for bioenergy – can it be a part of a sustainable energy future?

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Brexit and Energy: cost, security and climate policy implications

The UCL Institute for Sustainable Resources and the UCL European Institute have released a new paper on Brexit and the impact on UK climate and energy policy. This paper, written by Professor Michael Grubb, UCL ISR and Stephen Tindale, Director, Alvin Weinberg Foundation analyses the implications of Brexit for the UK’s energy sector. Despite significant uncertainties, the […]

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Cleaning the neighbourhood: How the EU can scrub out bad energy policy

The EU should not buy electricity from countries with highly-polluting coal power stations, and should instead support efficiency and clean energy in these countries.

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Could Donald Tusk use EU top job for anti-climate agenda?

Polish prime minister Donald Tusk is tipped to chair the European Council (Pic: Boston9)

My article for the Responding to Climate Change website in which I argue that Polish prime minister Tusk would not be a bad choice as president of the European Council – despite his pro-coal position.

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Financing and delivering a new energy infrastructure

This is a summary of a longer paper by Prashant Vaze and Ed Mayo on how a new, low-carbon energy infrastructure can be financed at reasonable cost.

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October 2015: Committee on Climate Change report on electricity scenarios

The Committee on Climate Change sensibly calls for an ‘all of the above’ approach to decarbonisation.

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Paqueta: a community running almost entirely on renewables

Paqueta: a community running almost entirely on renewables

A small island in Rio bay already gets most of its energy from renewables. It should move to become totally powered by solar, biogas and imported hydroelectricity.

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The case for a Clean Energy Alliance

The low-carbon energy sectors – efficiency, most renewables, CCS and nuclear – should work together more strategically

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The climate case for shale gas

Shale gas

For climate and air quality reasons, we need more gas. Shale gas is less bad than liquified natural gas – and better than coal.

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The Renewable Heat Incentive: A successful UK carbon policy?

1

Like the Climate Change Act the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) was a world first, showing the UK’s leadership in the decarbonisation sector and the benefits that come with it such as stimulating a new sector, and strengthening security of supply. But has it been successful? Constantly in the news at present, with fears mismanagement of […]

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